ANTIBOOKCLUB

Long live the death of print

Where's Poppa front cover

Where's Poppa?

by robert klane

Fiction, 6" x 9", paperback, 158 pages, November 2017, ISBN 978-0-9838683-6-1

Where’s Poppa? is a singular moment in American literary history; one in which the legacies of such authors as Joseph Heller and JD Salinger arrive at an unimaginably lewd yet inevitable terminus. It is the product of a Long Island–born Jew, not yet thirty, whose self-loathing found expression through the darkly outrageous and improbably hilarious and who would later give the world, not surprisingly, ninety minutes of convulsively funny cadaver abuse in the immensely popular film, Weekend at Bernie’s.
 
Robert Klane’s tasteless novel—along with his self-penned screen adaptation of the Carl Reiner–directed, cult motion picture starring George Segal and Ruth Gordon—has been offending and entertaining connoisseurs of black comedy since its first publication in 1970. Assuming you were not fortunate enough to put your hands on a copy of the now out-of-print and increasingly rare original, ANTIBOOKCLUB has come to your rescue with this first-ever reissue of this seminal work by a true master of the genre.

Robert Klane—whose first novel, The Horse is Dead, Jack Benny proclaimed to be, "Without a doubt the funniest book I have ever read."—lives with his Emmy award, his two dogs, and his wife in Woodland Hills, California, where he spends his free time being mostly ambulatory while awaiting what will hopefully be a swift and painless death.

Cover art by J.J. Sedelmaier

 
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don quixotic

by ben greenman

Fiction, 4.5" x 8", paperback, 214 pages, November 2017, ISBN: 978-0-9838683-4-7

Don Quixotic is a series of microfictions that turn on one massive fact—that the president is, if an outsized monster, also an ordinary human being. 

Don Quixotic looks inside Trump’s mind, and finds a Byzantine series of self-justifications, along with an array of odd obsessions, not to mention pain, pleasure, trivia, and consequence.

Don Quixotic is both provocation and keepsake. It is both experimental and traditional. It is literature that will both catch fire in the moment and last as long as humans have questions about the minds and motives of other humans.

 
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beautiful gravity

by martin hyatt

Fiction, 6"x9", paperback original, 224 pages, October 2016, ISBN 978-0-9975923-0-6

Loner Boz Matthews spends his days working at his grandfather’s Louisiana highway diner. His only friends are the Pentecostal preacher’s anorexic daughter, Meg, and the ghosts of dead movie stars. But when country music outlaws Catty Mills and Kyle Thomas come to town, Boz’s world is turned upside-down, leading to an emotionally turbulent and sexually liberating four-way relationship that challenges small-town beliefs and changes lives forever. Beautiful Gravity is a story of broken dreams and haunted Southern nights--a reminder of what it means to be loved and what it means to be set free.

Martin Hyatt was born just outside of New Orleans. He attended Goddard College and Eugene Lang College of The New School. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing and is the recipient of an Edward F. Albee Writing Fellowship and The New School Chapbook Award for fiction. His stories have been published in Lodestar QuarterlyThe Electric Literature BlogBlithe House Quarterly, and several award-winning anthologies. His first novel, A Scarecrow's Bible, published in 2006 to wide acclaim, won the Edmund White Debut Fiction Award and was a finalist for the Violet Quill Award, the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Debut Fiction, and the Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBT Men's Fiction. It was an alternate featured selection of the Doubleday/Insight Out Book Club and was also named a Stonewall Honor Book finalist by the American Library Association. New York magazine declared Martin to be a literary "Star of Tomorrow." Martin currently teaches Creative Writing at various colleges in the New York City area. He is currently completing a memoir entitled Greyhound Country and lives in Manhattan with his husband, physicist Massimo Porrati.

Cover design by John Gall

Interior by Will Petty

 
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yours in haste and adoration: selected letters of terry southern

edited by nile southern and brooke allen

Nonfiction, 12" x 9", hardcover, 368 pages, November 2015, ISBN 9780983868392

Terry Southern was one of the most outrageous and penetrating satirists of the twentieth century, judged by Gore Vidal to be "the most profoundly witty writer" of their generation. As a novelist (Candy, The Magic Christian, Blue Movie), screenwriter (Dr. Strangelove, Easy Rider, Barbarella), pioneer of the "New Journalism" at Esquire, and writer for Saturday Night Live, Southern had an incomparable gift for exposing the grotesqueries of the American Way of Life while living it to the full.

Southern's list of correspondents reads like a cultural Who's Who of the last half-century. In this collection we find letters to fellow writers including Nelson Algren, William S. Burroughs, George Plimpton, Alex Trocchi, Allen Ginsberg, Henry Green, Gregory Corso, playwright Jack Gelber, and Mason Hoffenberg (co-author of Candy). His letters extend to Hollywood luminaries such as Stanley Kubrick, Dennis Hopper, Rip Torn, and George Segal. Southern also corresponded through the years with legendary performers and artists of the day, among them Lenny Bruce, Harry Nilsson, Ringo Starr, John Lennon, Larry Rivers, and gallery scene-maker/impresario Robert Fraser. 

Even more idiosyncratic and outrageous when writing to his friends than he was for an audience, Southern dashed off a plethora of hilarious, shocking, frequently offensive, and unprintable missives to his many friends and colleagues. As this brilliant collection reveals, Southern was one of the great letter writers of the twentieth century.

Terry Southern (1924-1995) was an influential writer known for his unique, comic voice. His novels include Flash and FiligreeCandy (with Mason Hoffenberg), The Magic ChristianBlue Movie, and Texas Summer. His short stories have been anthologized in the collections Red Dirt Marijuana and Other Tastes and Now Dig This: The Unspeakable Writings of Terry Southern, edited by Nile Southern and Josh Alan Friedman. His biting satirical wit displayed in Dr. Strangelove and Easy Rider (both recipients of Academy Award®-nominations for Best Screenplay) continues to influence generations of writers and directors. His other film credits include: BarbarellaThe Loved OneThe Cincinnati KidEnd of the Road, and The Telephone. Michael O'Donoghue once proclaimed, “If there was a Mount Rushmore of American humor, Terry Southern would be the mountain they carve it from," while Norman Mailer called him the “heir to Nathanael West.”

Brooke Allen is the author of two books of literary essays, Twentieth-Century Attitudes andArtistic License; a work of history, Moral Minority: Our Skeptical Founding Fathers; and a travel narrative, The Other Side of the Mirror: An American Travels in Syria. She has also written a biography, Benazir Bhutto: Favored Daughter, forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Her essays and reviews have appeared in the New Criterion, the Hudson Review, the Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times Book Review, among other publications. She holds a PhD from Columbia University and teaches literature at Bennington College.

Nile Southern is a writer and filmmaker from New York City. His books include Now Dig This: The Unspeakable Writings of Terry Southern, 1950-1995 (edited with Josh Alan Friedman), and The CANDY Men: The Rollicking Life and Times of the Notorious Novel, CANDY (Arcade, 2004), which won Colorado’s Book of the Year for Creative Non-Fiction. He has written journalism for STOPSMILING, Cineaste, and the National Herald. His fiction includes The Anarchivists of Eco-Dub (altx.com ebooks), and has appeared in O-BlëkOpen City, Fiction Collective’s Black Ice, and ANTIBOOKCLUB’s A Brief History of Authoterrorism. He manages the Terry Southern Literary Trust, and is currently making a film about Terry Southern. He lives in Boulder, Colorado, with his wife and two daughters.

Book design by Will Petty

 
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the end of the world

by don hertzfeldt

OUT OF PRINT / SOLD OUT

Graphic novel, 8" x 8", 216 pages, hardcover, December 2013, ISBN 9780983868378

A graphic novel.

Don Hertzfeldt is a liar whose work includes The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Great Gatsby.

 
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french perfume

by amir tag elsir & william m. hutchins

Fiction, 7" x 4.25", 160 pages, paperback, June 2015, ISBN 9780983868385

A deliriously dark comedy exploring the absurd tragedy of the human condition when left to the devices of our tech-obsessed society.

“I had many things in mind that I wanted to achieve before the Frenchwoman Katia arrived…”

 So begins the story of Amir Tag Elsir’s French Perfume as told by Ali Jarjar — the town gossip and schemer of a poor community rich with sleazy bachelors, desperate women, soothsayers and secret police. Tasked to introduce his impoverished town to a chic foreign visitor, Ali’s attempts to make the best first impression are left in limbo as the newcomer perpetually postpones her trip. 

Quickly escalating to a terrifying conclusion, Spike Jonze’s Her crashes into Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot as our charming narrator allows his attraction for a stranger’s online existence to become a frightening obsession in the real world.

Amir Tag Elsir, who was born in the north of Sudan in 1960, currently lives in Doha, Qatar. He has published two biographies, a poetry collection, and fifteen novels. He studied medicine in Egypt and Great Britain and worked for many years in Sudan as a gynecologist before moving his practice to Qatar. He began by writing poetry but shifted to novels in 1987. Among his novels are The Dowry of Cries, The Copt’s Worries, French Perfume, and Crawling Ants. His novel Sa’id al-Yaraqat was shortlisted for the Arab Booker Prize in 2010 and published by Pearson in the African Writers Series as The Grub Hunter in 2012. Amir Tag Elsir is the nephew of the beloved and distinguished Sudanese author Tayeb Salih.

William Maynard Hutchins, who teaches at Appalachian State University of North Carolina, was educated at Berea, Yale and the University of Chicago. His translations appear in Words Without Borders, InTranslation at Brooklyn Rail and Banipal Magazine of Modern Arabic Literature. The Arabic novels he has translated include Palace Walk, Palace of Desire, Sugar Street, and Cairo Modern by Nobel Laureate Naguib Mahfouz; Basrayatha by the Iraqi author Muhammad Khudayyir; The Last of the Angels, Cell Block 5 and The Traveler and the Innkeeper by the Iraqi author Fadhil al-Azzawi; Return to Dar al-Basha by the Tunisian author Hassan Nasr; and Anubis, The Seven Veils of Seth and The Puppet by the Saharan author Ibrahim al-Koni. He has received two Literary Translation Awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, both for works by al-Koni. His most recent translations, in addition to The Diesel, are A Land Without Jasmine by the Yemeni author Wajdi al-Ahdal, The Grub Hunter by the Sudanese author Amir Tag Elsir and a newly revised translation of Return of the Spirit by Tawfiq al-Hakim.

Cover art by Porous Walker

Book design by Will Petty

 

the diesel

by thani al-suwaidi & william m. hutchins

Fiction, 4,5" x 8", paperback, 88 pages, ISBN 9780983868316

Introduction by William M. Hutchins
Book design by John Gall

In a small Arab community, one accustomed to ancestral attitudes and social constraints, a new world of radical sexual strength is evolving in secret, driven by a long dormant demon: The Diesel.

Nearly two decades before the rest of the world ever envisioned an Arab Spring, Emirati author Thani Al-Suwaidi saw a cultural shift on the horizon. Critically shunned when it was first published in 1994, his story is now a revelation for the modern world—a stream-of-consciousness dissection of our orthodox past and the perilous future we can no longer prevent.

The power of petroleum may be greater than any society could have ever imagined, especially in the Middle Eastern communities where it's actually produced. Amongst contrasting Arab cultures, characters and mystical creatures, The Diesel challenges its inhabitants to consider who they are and what they desire. This is a force that ultimately segregates fathers and sons, villages and empires, love and lust. And it’s been lingering beneath the soil since the world began.

Thani Al-Suwaidi was born in what is today the United Arab Emirates on July 1st, 1966. He has published two collections of poetry: Liyajiff Riq al-Bahr (So the Sea’s Foam May Dry Out, 1991) and al-Ashya’ Tamurr (Stuff Happens, 2000). Translations of six of Al-Suwaidi’s poems appear in Gathering the Tide: An Anthology of Contemporary Arabian Gulf Poetry (2011). His novella, al-Dizil (The Diesel) was published in 1994 in Beirut, reprinted in Baghdad in 2006 and in Cairo in 2008; this is the first English-language edition.

William Maynard Hutchins, who teaches at Appalachian State University of North Carolina, was educated at Berea, Yale and the University of Chicago. His translations appear in Words Without Borders, InTranslation at Brooklyn Rail and Banipal Magazine of Modern Arabic Literature. The Arabic novels he has translated include Palace Walk, Palace of Desire, Sugar Street, and Cairo Modern by Nobel Laureate Naguib Mahfouz; Basrayatha by the Iraqi author Muhammad Khudayyir; The Last of the Angels, Cell Block 5 and The Traveler and the Innkeeper by the Iraqi author Fadhil al-Azzawi; Return to Dar al-Basha by the Tunisian author Hassan Nasr; and Anubis, The Seven Veils of Seth and The Puppet by the Saharan author Ibrahim al-Koni. He has received two Literary Translation Awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, both for works by al-Koni. His most recent translations, in addition to The Diesel, are A Land Without Jasmine by the Yemeni author Wajdi al-Ahdal, The Grub Hunter by the Sudanese author Amir Tag Elsir and a newly revised translation of Return of the Spirit by Tawfiq al-Hakim.

 
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bibliodeath: my archives (with life in footnotes)

by andrei codrescu

Memoir, 6" x 10", paperback, 168 pages, June 2012, ISBN 9780983868330

OUT OF PRINT / A FEW COPIES STILL AVAILABLE

In our brave new world, techno-evolution is often decried as the death knell of the written word. Award-winning author Andrei Codrescu demolishes this doomsday provocation in Bibliodeath: My Archives (With Life in Footnotes).

Our moment of bibliodeath marks a tectonic shift under the ocean of human consciousness and the written word. As words migrate from the book into other means of transport, we are "privy to...the passage of the soul from one body into another, a reincarnation that is not a metaphysics." A suspenseful mediation planted in a bed of alluring stories-cum-footnotes, Codrescu wades into the bibliodeath waters to examine his own evolution as a writer. From the poetic lines of an unlined notebook in 1960s Romania to the founding of Exquisite Corpse in 1983 to his ongoing commentary on NPR's All Things Considered, his journey is an archive of reinvention. Codrescu's literal Archives and his unsentimental and savage faith in reinvention take in the history of the literate world, the transformation of the printed word, and language itself.

This picaresque adventure of a mind at work spans the fin-de-siecle to the 21st century, as the bibliodeath of one medium meets the birth of the next. The evolution of technology must deal with the indomitable bond between language and the human being. In the story of Codrescu, "leaving the traces of one's passage is worth the labor of a lifetime."

Andrei Codrescu, pronounced Code-rescue (codrescu.com) was born in Sibiu, Romania. He was the McCurdy Distinguished Professor at LSU until he retired to the woods in 2009. He has written poetry, novels, and essays, and has broadcast regular commentary for NPR since 1983. Also in 1983, he founded Exquisite Corpse: a Journal of Life and Letters (www.corpse.org). He won a Peabody Award for his film “Road Scholar,” the Ovid Prize for poetry, and the ACLU Freedom of Speech Award.

Book design by Will Petty

 
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a brief history of authoterrorism

edited by gabriel levinson

Short fiction anthology, 4" x 5", 120 pages, September 2011, ISBN 9780983868309

OUT OF PRINT / A FEW COPIES STILL AVAILABLE

In this short story collection, eight contemporary authors take aim against the hyperbole of the death of print by exploring just how far writers and artists will go to promote themselves in an evolving world where the laws of decorum no longer apply. Prophetic, harrowing, and at times laugh-out-loud humorous, these stories walk the fine line between fiction and fact, art and apocalypse, to chronicle a trend that cannot be ignored.

Andrei Codrescu, pronounced Code-rescue (codrescu.com) was born in Sibiu, Romania. He was the McCurdy Distinguished Professor at LSU until he retired to the woods in 2009. He has written poetry, novels, and essays, and has broadcast regular commentary for NPR since 1983. Also in 1983, he founded Exquisite Corpse: a Journal of Life and Letters (www.corpse.org). He won a Peabody Award for his film “Road Scholar,” the Ovid Prize for poetry, and the ACLU Freedom of Speech Award.

Jeffrey Dorchen was born in Detroit, Michigan. He is a writer, actor, musician, artist and radio pundit. A founding member of the internationally acclaimed Chicago-based Theater Oobleck, his award-winning, innovative performance and theater work has been produced to critical acclaim in New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles and South Africa and garnered him a MacArthur Foundation grant. He is a nationally published essayist who for the past thirteen years has delivered political commentary on the weekly public affairs show This Is Hell, (WNUR, Evanston and Chicago). He has also appeared on several episodes of public radio’s This American Life. His one-act play “Ubu Papa” appears in the current issue of The Louisville Review. He is working on a book about the parallels between iconography depicting the Hindu god Ganesh and the Jewish lay and religious exegetical traditions. He lives in Los Angeles.

Ben Greenman is an editor at the New Yorker and the author of several acclaimed books of fiction, including Superbad, Please Step Back, and What He’s Poised To Do. His most recent book is not Celebrity Chekhov. He lives in Brooklyn.

Mark Jay Mirsky is the editor of Fiction, a magazine he co-founded with Donald Barthelme, Max Frisch and Jane deLynn. A professor of English at the City College of New York he has published four novels, Thou Worm Jacob, Blue Hill Avenue (recently listed by the Boston Sunday Globe as one of the 100 essential books about New England) Proceedings of the Rabble, The Red Adam, and a collection of novellas,The Secret Table. Other books of his include My Search for the Messiah, Dante, Eros and Kabbalah The Absent Shakespeare, and the forthcoming, Drama in the Sonnets of Shakespeare, “A Satire to Decay.” He is the editor of the Diaries of Robert Musil in English, and has co-edited the collection Rabbinic Fantasies and a historical volume, The Jews of Pinsk, 1506-1880. His play, Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard was produced at Manhattan’s Fringe Festival in 2007.

David Rees is a freelance wine consultant and budding fashion-industry insider who lives on the cutting edge of innovation and style. You can usually find him at the hottest club or the trendiest new restaurant.

Nile Southern is a writer and filmmaker from New York City. His books include Now Dig This: The Unspeakable Writings of Terry Southern, 1950-1995 (edited with Josh Alan Friedman), and The CANDY Men: The Rollicking Life and Times of the Notorious Novel, CANDY (Arcade, 2004), which won Colorado’s Book of the Year for Creative Non-Fiction. He has written journalism for STOPSMILING, Cineaste, and the National Herald. His fiction includes The Anarchivists of Eco-Dub (altx.com ebooks), and has appeared in O-BlëkOpen City, Fiction Collective’s Black Ice, and ANTIBOOKCLUB’s A Brief History of Authoterrorism. He manages the Terry Southern Literary Trust, and is currently making a film about Terry Southern. He lives in Boulder, Colorado, with his wife and two daughters.

Terry Southern (1924-1995) was an influential writer known for his unique, comic voice. His novels include Flash and FiligreeCandy (with Mason Hoffenberg), The Magic ChristianBlue Movie, and Texas Summer. His short stories have been anthologized in the collections Red Dirt Marijuana and Other Tastes and Now Dig This: The Unspeakable Writings of Terry Southern, edited by Nile Southern and Josh Alan Friedman. His biting satirical wit displayed in Dr. Strangelove and Easy Rider (both recipients of Academy Award®-nominations for Best Screenplay) continues to influence generations of writers and directors. His other film credits include: BarbarellaThe Loved OneThe Cincinnati KidEnd of the Road, and The Telephone. Michael O'Donoghue once proclaimed, “If there was a Mount Rushmore of American humor, Terry Southern would be the mountain they carve it from," while Norman Mailer called him the “heir to Nathanael West.”

Whitney Anne Trettien is working toward a PhD in English at Duke University. She has created, produced and/or published on seventeenth-century generative writing, moving parts in books, fore-edge paintings, digital poetry, bibliobotanies and early modern plant-animal hybrids. Visit her online at whitneyannetrettien.com.

Cover art by Jay Ryan

Book design by Mollie Edgar